Methi ki roti

A friend as work introduced me to these delicious rotis ( bread) that his wife had packed for lunch. So grateful that he shared them with me. I made these at home as a low gluten version

Methi or fenugreek can be used dry or fresh. It is used in multiple cuisines such as Indian, Persian and Egyptian. Methi has multiple health benefits including helping lower cholesterol.

About the flours:

Jowar (white millet) is a gluten-free, high-protein, cholesterol-free source of essential nutrients, including dietary fiber, iron, phosphorus and thiamine. It is a great substitute for whole wheat.

Bajri is another millet flour full of nutrients

Rye is lower in gluten that wheat and high in fiber. It has been touted to work well for weight loss.

The dough will no be very pliable due to the low gluten content so use your hands and light pressure on the rolling pin to roll them out.

1 cup of Rye flour

1 cup of bajri flour

1 cup of jowar flour

1 cup of dry methi leaves

1/2 cup of kefir or youghurt

1/2 tsp of himalayan salt

 

Knead the dough with a bit of warm water as needed.

Roll out the rotis and cook on a flat pan with a dash of ghee. Serve with a side of chutney and vegetable korma. It is a delicious as a snack by itself.

 

Coriander Coconut chutney

I am always exploring good and healing Ayurvedic recipes. The simplicity and balance found in such form of cooking balances the pittas and is good for the soul. This is a variation of a Coriander chutney that I found on an Ayurvedic website and was inspired to try it out.

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Coriander also known and Cilantro contains antioxidants and has antibacterial properties. It has also been documented to be used for traditional treatment of Type 2 diabetes.

All the good stuff aside, I LOVE Coriander and find something to use it in pretty much everyday.

This chutney was served with Methi Roti ( recipe coming), Green pea pulao and yoghurt.

I used frozen shredded coconut that was unsweetened and had no added preservatives.

Cumin and mustard seeds are readily available in supermarket. I have a plant of curry leaves but you can always buy a bunch from the local asian grocery store.

Heeng or Asafoetida is used as a flavor enhanced and as a digestive aid. It has a strong pungent smell so a pinch is just enough. You can choose not to use it at all.

A bunch on green coriander ( stems and all)

1 cup of shredded coconut

water

3 green chilis

2 inch fresh ginger peeled and chopped

1/2 tsp cumin seeds

1/2 tsp mustard seeds

8 pieces of curry leaves

pinch of heeng (Asafoetida)

1 lemon

1 tsp ghee

Blend the Coriander, ginger, coconut and green chili in a blender adding water to bring it to a good consistency.  Add lemon juice and salt to taste

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Sizzle the cumin, mustard seeds  in ghee. Add Heeng and curry leaves. give it about 30 seconds and turn off the heat.

5-IMG_2255 Once cool add to the Coriander paste and your chutney is ready.

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Nun Chai ( Kashmiri tea)

Kashmiri Nun Chai

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Nun Chai was not traditionally made in our house while I was growing up so I relied on other resources to savor this wonderful salty tea. Memories include waiting for the housekeeper to wake up or knocking on the their shack behind our house to get a cupful. Earlier memories revolve around waiting for Sunday afternoons when the very old “dai” would walk 5 miles to our house and I would coax her into making me tea. Sitting outside early mornings or lazy afternoons, this tea always warmed my soul.

With no access to a Samovar, hot coals and time…the recipe below is simple, inspired by a verbal recipe rally between friends and some experiments at home. Variations and secrets are welcome.

 

Tips:

Nun Chai leaves are green tea not black tea so try to use the authentic leaves ( borrow from friends)

Use good baking soda ( a little goes a long way). Good baking soda will not bubble up and make it bitter  but will give the tea it’s pink color.

Use a egg beater to really whip up the tea

 

Tea for 4

6 cups of water

1 and 1/2 teaspoons of nun chai leaves

a pinch of soda

2 cups of milk ( low fat if you like it thin and clear)

 

Boil the tea with one cup of water and baking soda until the water has reduced to one third.

Add another cup of water and boil and simmer. Use the whip to beat the tea leaves apart until you see the pink color.

Add the rest of the water and brew for 20-30 mins.

Add milk and salt to taste. Bring to a boil.

Enjoy a cup with friends.

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Bok Choy, Shiitake and Forbidden rice

This dish is simple  takes very little time to make. It can be a go to meal for week days or any other day.

Bok Choy is versatile and delicious. It is classified as a Chinese cabbage and was introduced in Europe in the 1800s. It is readily available in supermarket these days grown organically.

The mushrooms I have used are dried Shiitake. Shiitake mushrooms recognized as a very good source of iron have been used medicinally by the Chinese for more than 6,000 years. They are abundant in the marketplace these days. I soaked a cup in warm water for a couple of hours so they can plump up.

Forbidden rice; This heirloom rice has a  delicious roasted nutty taste, soft texture and a deep purple color. Extremely high in a class of flavonoid antioxidants and rich in iron, it looks beautiful on a plate.

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5-6 baby Bok Choy greens with trimmed end ( organic and washed)

1 cup Shiitake ( soaked )

2 cloves of garlic ( sliced)

2 dry red pepper (fresh would be fine too)

2 tablespoon  ginger

2 tablespoon soy sauce

1 tablespoon mirin

1 tsp toasted sesame seeds

1 cup cooked Forbidden rice

 

Use  a tablespoon of sesame oil in a heavy pan and add the red peppers and garlic. After the garlic is light brown add bok choy. Let them sizzle for a few minutes. Add grated ginger, mushrooms and the sauces. Cover and let it steam for 5- 10 mins. Top with sesame seeds and server over forbidden rice.

 

A tangy take on Tofu and rice noodles

This broth-y spicy dish has so many variations that is it hard to go wrong. Always feeds all the senses…

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The basic taste is that of Thai food but crosses over to Indian with the addition of curry powder and garam masala. Temper the spices to your taste but if you enjoy spicy food then use the amounts I recommend.

Start off with a tablespoon of good coconut oil in a heavy bottomed pan. Add chunks of firm organic tofu and let it fry for a few minutes. Add 1 tablespoon of curry powder and 1 tsp of garam masala. Fry the spices for another few minutes.

Add 1 heaping tablespoon of red thai curry paste, 3 cloves of crushed garlic and 1 tsp of finely chopped ginger. Add 1 cup of light coconut milk and cook for a couple of minutes.

Add 2-3 cups of vegetable broth, 1 green zucchini chopped in large pieces, 1 red bell pepper chopped in large chunks, 1 cup soaked dry shiitake mushrooms, 2 red thai peppers – halfed.

Let it cook for about 10 minutes at medium heat. Add a handful of rice noodles and cook another 5-10 minutes.

Adjust the salt to taste.

Serve topped with red onions, green chillies, crushed peanuts, Cilantro and lime.

 

 

Coconut Kheer ( coconut rice pudding)

This turned out so good that I had to write this blog. Something about kheer is so comforting, this is a twist on the traditional recipe making it a little healthier with all natural ingredients.

1-IMG_2109 2-IMG_2112 3-IMG_21182 cups or whole milk

2 cup coconut or almond milk

1/2 cup rice, soaked overnight

coconut palm sugar ( 1 cup or to taste)

1 tablespoon butter

1 tablespoon psyllium husk

1/2 cup shredded coconut ( i used the frozen kind)

1/4 cup almond slices

6-7 pods of green cardamon (crushed), pinch of saffron strands

Fry the rice for a few minutes in the butter, add milk and let it cook for a hour until the milk is reduced. I used a hand blended for a few seconds to crush the rice.

Add the coconut, sugar and cardamon and cook another 10 mins

Add psyllium, saffron and almonds and remove from heat.

Let it set for a few hours and top with berries.

Chocolate Raspberry Tart

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I usually don’t blog deserts but this one must be shared. Heart healthy and absolutely divine. Inspired by Peggy Ks healthful recipe I decided to give it a shot.

No baking is required. I bought the mini cake pans for this and so glad I did.02-IMG_2081

For the crust you need to grind up

1/2 cup pecans; 1 cup golden raisins; 1/2 cup shredded coconut; 1 teaspoon coconut nectar or agave; 2 tablespoon raw cacao powder

Spread the crust out in 3 pans lined with parchment paper. Put it in the fridge while you work on the filling04-IMG_2083

For the filling use a good blend and blend up

2 cups raw cashews; 4 tablespoon cocoa powder; 1 tbsp espresso or any good instant coffee;  1/2 cup frozen raspberries; 1/2 cup water; 1/2 cup coconut sugar; 1 teaspoon vanilla extract. 1tsp cacao nibs, 1 tsp Maca powder (optional)….once blended add a tablespoon of psyllium husk to thicken.

Pour in the filling and refrigerate for a couple of hours until set05-IMG_2084

It can be topped with fresh Raspberries with a side of coconut milk ice cream.

Amazing on the taste buds and heart healthy. I know I will make this over and over again.13-IMG_209115-IMG_2093

 

 

great food and discovery of the soul

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