Coconut Flour Tostadas with Cilantro Steak

Spicy tangy flavors seem to make everything better for me….the sense of the spice, the heat and the sour is a dance on the taste buds.

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In a quest to make gluten free tostadas I have experimented with flours quite a bit which have resulted in as many fails as successes. A combination of coconut flour with some almond flour added in seems to hold it’s own for me. I have seen people add xanthan gum so the dough becomes pliable but I did not have any so went without.

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There are layers of flavors in this recipe.

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With the dough in place, I started with grated beets and carrots and marinated them with lemon juice and salt for 5 mins.

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The steak is grass fed organic and turns out just amazing

The Cilantro sauce is a staple in my kitchen and I have used it as a marinade and topping. You can find the recipe below and another version here.

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CilantroChutney-5702Now to the fermented red cabbage….just delicious and so good for you. This add the right amount of tanginess and crunch.

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This dish is topped with fresh watercress and a sprinkle of goat cheese.

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Coconut Flour Tostadas with Cilantro Steak

  • Servings: 2
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

a gluten free tostada layered with steak and fermented vegetables

Ingredients

Tostadas

  • 1 1/2 cup coconut flour
  • 1/2 cup almond flour
  • 2 organic eggs
  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • 1/2 tsp sea salt
  • 1/2 tsp cayenne pepper
  • Cold water for the dough

Beet and carrot salad

  • 1 beet and 1 carrot – grated
  • Juice of 1 lemon
  • 1 tsp grated lemon peel
  • Pink salt

Steak

  • 1-2 portions of organic grass fed steak

Cilantro Sauce

  • 1/2 bunch fresh cilantro ( 2 cups)
  • 1/2 cup olive oil
  • 1/3 cup rice wine vinegar
  • 3 garlic cloves, peeled
  • 2 serrano chilies
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cumin
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt

Watercress leaves and goat cheese for garnish

Cabbage Pickle: Recipe can be found here

Directions

  • Blend the ingredients for the Cilantro sauce adjusting the salt to taste
  • Marinate the steak in the cilantro sauce for an hour or overnight if you have the time.
  • Combine the ingredients for the beet and carrot salad and set aside
  • For the tostadas, combine the flour, oil salt, pepper and eggs. Add water in small increments, just enough for the dough to come together. It will be crumbly.
  • Using a tortilla press between plastic wrap, press the tostadas out gently. You have to be careful as the dough is crumbly with the gluten and it may take a couple of tries.
  • Pan fry in olive oil until both sides are browned.
  • Grill the steak, 5 mins on each side and let it rest for 5 mins. Slice in  2 inch pieces.
  • Using the tostadas as a base, top with the beet mixture, steak pieces, red cabbage pickle, cilantro sauce and watercress
  • Top with goat cheese or any other cheese you prefer.
  • Serve with a side of the cilantro sauce.

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Jhuls is the solo cohost this week at Fiesta Friday. Do check out her blog at  Jhuls @ The Not So Creative Cook
Also linking up on Saucy Saturdays

Fermented Food experiments #2 -Beet Kanji

Fermented foods are just beautiful  not only for the taste buds but also for your gut.  Ancients culture have propagated fermented foods for preservation and taste through the centuries. The souring action if microbes that produced fermentation have been critical in our diets throughout  the globe.  Similar foods can be found in every culture,  just called something different.
Indian “Achar” or “Kanji” are great examples and so is the fabulous “Kimchi” from Korea.
My personal story takes me back to the late 1970’s where as a young girl spending lazy winters vacation in Lucknow, India  I would watch my grandfather ferment and pickle various vegetables in earthenware and produce the probiotic liquid called “Kanji” in India. It  was delicious, tart and healthy and the joy of helping my grandfather  while he worked on these beautiful foods is a memory that is permanent ink in my soul.
True to foods that nourish your soul and help you remember your history, in this series I am sharing different fermented food s I am experimenting with.
Click here for a previous recipe of Kashmiri Achar
Click here for a previous recipe of Red Cabbage Pickle

In this edition: Fermented Beet tonic – Kanji

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BeetKanji-5786This fermented beet pickle and tonic fascinates  and mesmerizes with its deep violet color and tangy taste. There many health benefits of both the beets and these are just amplified through fermenting.

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“Kanji”  is usually a pungent combination of water, mustard seeds, beetroot and carrots and is full of digestion-boosting friendly bacteria and enzymes. I have only used beets here so the color is quite intense. Beets are high is sugar but the fermentation breaks the sugars down and makes this drink a healthy tonic. Very similar to Kvass which is an eastern European fermented beverage commonly made with rye bread.

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Fermented Beets - Kanji

  • Servings: many
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

a zesty beet fermented drink and pickle

Ingredients

  • 3 – 4 large organic beets
  • 3 tbsp mustard seeds
  • 3 whole red chilies ( Serrano)
  • 2 tsp pink Himalayan salt
  • 6–7 cups filtered water

Directions

  • Wash and Slice and dice the beets in bite size pieces. I like to leave to skin on for organic beets.
  • Crush mustard seeds with mortar and pestle just to a coarse grind
  • Place the diced beets and carrots into a half-gallon glass jar.
  • Add the Serrano pepper, mustard seeds and salt.
  • Add the water, leaving one-inch of air space between the top of the water and the top of the jar. Tightly cover the jar.
  • Ferment the kanji for 2-3 days at room temperature.
  • Stir with a clean wooden spoon and taste. If it’s tangy – it’s fermented and ready
  • You can transfer the jar to the fridge and store for a few weeks.

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Enjoy a cup or bowl of this delicious liquid and eat the pickles beet and add them to your salad.

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Divine!

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Sharing this at Angie’s Fiesta Friday

Fermented food experiments #1 – Red Cabbage quick pickle

Fermented foods are just beautiful  not only for the taste buds but also for your gut.  Ancients culture have propagated fermented foods for preservation and taste through the centuries. The souring action if microbes that produced fermentation have been critical in our diets throughout  the globe.  Similar foods can be found in every culture,  just called something different.

Indian “Achar” or “Kanji” are great examples and so is the fabulous “Kimchi” from Korea.

My personal story takes me back to the late 1970’s where as a young girl spending lazy winters vacation in Lucknow, India  I would watch my grandfather ferment and pickle various vegetables in earthenware and produce the probiotic liquid called “Kanji” in India. It  was delicious, tart and healthy and the joy of helping my grandfather  while he worked on these beautiful foods is a memory that is permanent ink in my soul.

True to foods that nourish your soul and help you remember your history, in this series I am sharing different fermented foods I am experimenting with.

Click here for a previous recipe of Kashmiri Achar

In this edition: Red Cabbage Pickle

https://foodforthesoul00.files.wordpress.com/2017/03/redcabbagepickle-5765.jpg?w=474

Continue reading Fermented food experiments #1 – Red Cabbage quick pickle

Lemon Grass Chicken with Jicama Salad

Thai cooking has always been a passion, with fresh aromatic ingredients like lemon grass, cilantro, chilies and ginger, the possibilities of creating dishes is endless. This cuisine brings to the world  the 5 flavors of sweet, salty, sour, bitter and hot. The  subtle variation in proportions of ingredients used highlights these flavors.

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I am fortunate to have a store within a mile that carries fresh Thai ingredients ( except for Kaffir lime leaves). Kaffir lime leaves are essential flavoring in Thai cooking and I found a wonderful online store for a bag of dried leaves. The smell is heavenly.

Lemon Grass ( or Takrai) is widely available and sold in bunches. The edible portion is about 4-6 inches from the root. The rest can be used for flavoring broths.

lemongrass-chickenI am using fresh mushrooms but If you have dried shiitake mushrooms just soak them in warm water until they are soft and use the broth in cooking as well.

Continue reading Lemon Grass Chicken with Jicama Salad

Kashmiri Pulao – Rice with mushrooms and vegetables

kashmiripulao-9050-2This medley of rice and vegetables is inspired by the Kashmiri Pulao that uses morel mushrooms. I did not have the wild expensive mushrooms so used the dried  shiitake I hand in my pantry. Soaked in warm water for about 20 mins brings out the earthiness and the umami flavors. Don’t discard the golden liquid from the mushrooms, it adds immense flavor.

kashmiripulao-9046I also used cauliflower in this recipe…cut in florets and pan fried with a touch of sea salt.

The basic Kashmiri pulao recipes packs a punch with whole spices…I have used cinnamon, cloves, cardamom, whole pepper, dried ginger and bay leaves.

Saffron is my favorite and it had been used blooming in warm water.

I have also added soaked almond, walnuts and raisins…feel free to experiment.

Once again I am honored to be c0-hosting and feasting with such amazing and talented virtual friends at Fiesta Friday. Our host Angie has done such a wonderful job providing us with this forum and inviting us to a global table. I am also honored to be co-hosting alongside Jhuls and am a big fan :), do check out her blog if you have not already.

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Kashmiri Pulao with Mushrooms and Cauliflower

  • Servings: 2
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

a flavorful pulao with fragrant spices and vegetables

Ingredients

                                                                                     

  • 10 pieces dried shitake mushrooms
  • 2 cups of cauliflower bites (about 1 inch pieces)
  • 2 cups of basmati rice washed and soaked for 10 mins
  • 2 tablespoon ghee or butter
  • 1 onions chopped
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 4-5 black cardamoms
  • 5-6 green cardamoms
  • 5-8 whole peppercorns
  • 2 small sticks of cinnamon
  • 1 tea spoon cumin seeds
  • 1 tsp ginger powder
  • 5-6 cloves
  • 1 pinch saffron
  • 2  1/2 cup water ( including the mushroom broth)
  • Grapeseed oil for frying the vegetables
  • 1/2 Almonds, walnuts and raisins soaked for 30 mins and chopped
  • Lemon juice
  • Salt to taste
  • /recipe-ingredients]

Directions

  • Soak the mushrooms in 1 cup warm water for 30 minutes. Strain the water and slice the mushrooms. Save the water to cook the rice.
  • Soak the saffron in a tablespoon of warm  water
  • Dice the cauliflower and pan fry in oil until just brown
  • Drain, slice and Fry the mushrooms and set aside
  • In a heavy bottomed pan, add ghee and chopped onion, sauté until translucent.
  • Add bay leaf, cardamoms, cinnamon, cloves, black pepper and cumin seeds. Let it splutter.
  • Now add the soaked rice and vegetables.
  • Add the ginger powder.
  • Add water (including the mushroom water) to cover the rice plus 1/2 inch.
  • Salt to taste
  • Squeeze 4-5 drops of lemon juice in the mixture and let it cook on low/medium heat for 20 minutes until the rice is done.
  • Using 2 tablespoon of ghee, fry the nuts and raisins until just toasted and add to the rice when serving.
  • Serve with a side of mint raita

Beautifully fragrant and delicious.

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Also linking up at Suacy Saturdays

Molokhia – Cooking Egyptian

On a cold windy winter day nothing like a soul warming chicken soup with Molokhia;) What is that you say?

Molokhia  also known as Jute, or Jews Mallow is the name of both a plant and a dish. A nutrient powerhouse,  it has three times the calcium and phosphorous as Kale, and four times the amount of riboflavin. It also has abundant  Vitamin C, Vitamin A amongst a host of other minerals and vitamins.

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It is eaten widely eaten throughout the Middle East and Asia but the origins are said to be in ancient Egypt. It does have a Okra like consistency which is an acquired taste to some people. I fell in love with it the first time I had it ( courtesy my fab sister in law). I  have add additional spices in the stock to add to the flavor.

Fresh Molokhia leaves are hard to find here so I have used the perfect frozen ones which are stripped and minced already. The preparation here with whole chicken and spices is true comfort food.

Often the chicken from the stock is cut into quarters and fried in butter or roasted in the oven but I have kept it straight, simple and healthy

 

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Truly addictive “umami” food.

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Molokhia

  • Servings: many
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

Egyptian Molokhia with Chicken

Ingredients

INGREDIENTS:

Chicken stock

  • 1 organic whole roasting chicken
  • 2 cinnamon sticks
  • 4 cardamom pods
  • 1 chopped onion
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 5 cloves of garlic
  • 8 peppercorns
  • 2-3 cloves
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • Water (enough to submerge chicken)

Rice

  • 2 cups of rice cooked in 1 tsp salt and 1 tsp clarified butter (optional). You can use a rice cooker.

Molokhia

  • 2 tablespoons chopped garlic
  • 1 tablespoon ground coriander
  • 2 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 package of frozen chopped molokhia

Directions

  • Add the whole chicken and all the stock ingredients, salt and enough water to a stock pot  or a pressure cooker. The chicken should be completely submerged. Cover and bring to a boil, lower the  heat down to medium and cook the chicken for 1 hour. If using a pressure cooker it should be done in 15 mins.
  • Take the chicken out, separate the pieces
  • Strain the spices from the stock in a sieve and reserve the stock.
  • In a heavy bottomed pot, add the two cups of stock , tsp minced garlic and 1 tsp coriander
  • Add the frozen chopped Molokhia and cook until jus bubbling. Turn off the heat. Do not boil the Molokhia too long.
  • In a mortar and pestle crush 2-3 cloves of garlic with 1 tsp ground coriander and some of the  olive oil
  • In a  fry pan, add olive oil and then the crushed  garlic mixture. Fry until golden and add this tempering to the Molokhia and stir
  • Add lemon juice  to the Molokhia.
  • Check the salt and pepper and adjust to taste
  • To serve, put the rice in a large platter. Section the chicken into pieces and place them on top of the rice. Serve the Molokhia in a separate bowl to pour on the rice and chicken.
  •  Often the chicken from the stock is cut into quarters and fried in butter or roasted in the oven but I have kept it straight, simple and healthy

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Joining Angie with this dish at Fiesta Friday!

Pineapple Harissa Salmon with Tahini Greens

A healthy recipe bursting with deep flavors of pineapple, tahini and rose harissa spice blend.

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Angie’s  Healthy Recipe Challenge is on and I am pretty late in thinking about combining leafy greens and pineapple. I like spice in my recipes so pineapple is the perfect sweet to cut through those spices. A wild caught salmon is perfect to showcase the flavors with quinoa, arugula and baby spinach and a perfect tahini  dressing.

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I used Elaine’s Rose Harissa Blend ( Thank you Elaine!). Do check it out on her blog and the fantastic ways she has used it in many recipes.

A little bit about the dressing….Tahini can be made at home or you can buy the good quality organic tahini in a bottle. Tahini is sesame paste and has fat in it. No additional fat is needed in the dressing. The apple cider vinegar gives it the tartness, pineapple the sweetness and aminos or tamari gives a bit of salt and flavor.  This can be stored and used in  many dishes that you will make. Top it over falafels, burgers, fritters and anything your heart desires.

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Pineapple Tahini Dressing

So with that said, the pineapple and greens challenge has been well incorporated in this dish 🙂

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Pineapple Harissa Salmon with Tahini Greens

  • Servings: 2
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

a harissa spiced salmon baked in the oven served with tahini dressing over greens

Ingredients

Salmon:

  • 2-3 pieces of  wild-caught Salmon

Harissa Spice mix marinade:

Dressing:

  • 2 tablespoon tahini
  • 1/2 cup pineapple pieces
  • 2 tablespoon coconut amino or tamari
  • 1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar
  • Pink or Sea Salt – to taste

Salad and Toppings:

  • Arugula and Baby spinach
  • 1 cup cooked quinoa
  • Toasted walnuts
  • Chopped Pineapple
  • Sliced Avocados

Directions

Salmon

  • Use a blender to combine the Harissa marinade ingredients  and marinate the salmon pieces for 30 mins.
  • Preheat the oven to 425F
  • Put the salmon on the baking sheet (skin-side down), then put it in the oven.
  • Bake for 8-10 minute.

Greens

  • Mix quinoa and  greens together with dressing, I have used arugula, spinach  but any fresh salad greens are good here.

Dressing

  • Put the dressing ingredients in a blender and blend until smooth and creamy.

 

Assemble the greens, top with walnuts and dressing. Plate the salmon and top with sliced avocados and pineapple.

 

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great food and discovery of the soul

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