Tag Archives: Fermented Foods

Turmeric Ginger tonic

I make this every week but have never really photographed it or posted the recipe until now, not sure why and this is totally something you want to share with everyone.

This is good for you…. for the gut and general healing. It is fermented and There is heat in the turmeric and ginger so adjust the quantity based on your own body type and digestive system

Turmeric contains a compound called curcumin, which is anti inflammatory. Ginger happens to be a natural anti-inflammatory and antioxidant. Lemon is naturally detoxifying boosts the immune system. Allof it together is one solid health shot!!!

I normally add water to a 1/4 cup of the fermented tonic and drink it every morning with a dash of lemon juice

Beautifully healing from all things evil and toxic for the body especially for the gut.

The fermentation process needs some sugar, I have used both honey and a vegan option of rice or coconut syrup. Please adjust to your liking.

The tamarind is key to bring on the tartness. Please do not omit ( I guess you could but it would not be the same).   Tamarind pods can be found in the local Asian stores.

So here is the recipe:

This recipe is not precise, please do adjust as you wish.

Ingredients:

  • 10 fresh turmeric pods
  • 1 pod of ginger ( about 4 inches)
  • 7 dry tamarind ponds
  • 2 lemons
  • 2 tablespoon coconut nectar or honey or rice syrup

Directions:

  • Remove the shell of the tamarind pods and bol them in water on low heat covering just barely. This takes about 10 mins. Cool and them use your hands to removes the shells and strings until everything is a pulp.
  • Chop the fresh turmeric and ginger and boil for 20 mins until golden brown. Cool to room temperature.
  • Blend the turmeric ginger in a high speed blender. Add tamarind, nectar and lemon juice until everything is smooth and combined. If it is thick you can add some water.
  • Pour into glass containers, cover with muslin and ferment in a dark dry place for 2 days.
  • Once fermented you can cover the bottles and move into the fridge.
  • You can strain into a glass, add some lemon juice and drink once a day!
turmeric ginger tonic with tamarind

Fermented Food experiments #2 -Beet Kanji

Fermented foods are just beautiful  not only for the taste buds but also for your gut.  Ancients culture have propagated fermented foods for preservation and taste through the centuries. The souring action if microbes that produced fermentation have been critical in our diets throughout  the globe.  Similar foods can be found in every culture,  just called something different.
Indian “Achar” or “Kanji” are great examples and so is the fabulous “Kimchi” from Korea.
My personal story takes me back to the late 1970’s where as a young girl spending lazy winters vacation in Lucknow, India  I would watch my grandfather ferment and pickle various vegetables in earthenware and produce the probiotic liquid called “Kanji” in India. It  was delicious, tart and healthy and the joy of helping my grandfather  while he worked on these beautiful foods is a memory that is permanent ink in my soul.
True to foods that nourish your soul and help you remember your history, in this series I am sharing different fermented food s I am experimenting with.
Click here for a previous recipe of Kashmiri Achar
Click here for a previous recipe of Red Cabbage Pickle

In this edition: Fermented Beet tonic – Kanji

https://foodforthesoul00.files.wordpress.com/2017/03/beetkanji-5782.jpg

BeetKanji-5786This fermented beet pickle and tonic fascinates  and mesmerizes with its deep violet color and tangy taste. There many health benefits of both the beets and these are just amplified through fermenting.

BeetKanji-5753

“Kanji”  is usually a pungent combination of water, mustard seeds, beetroot and carrots and is full of digestion-boosting friendly bacteria and enzymes. I have only used beets here so the color is quite intense. Beets are high is sugar but the fermentation breaks the sugars down and makes this drink a healthy tonic. Very similar to Kvass which is an eastern European fermented beverage commonly made with rye bread.

BeetKanji-5756

BeetKanji-5757

Fermented Beets - Kanji

  • Servings: many
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

a zesty beet fermented drink and pickle

Ingredients

  • 3 – 4 large organic beets
  • 3 tbsp mustard seeds
  • 3 whole red chilies ( Serrano)
  • 2 tsp pink Himalayan salt
  • 6–7 cups filtered water

Directions

  • Wash and Slice and dice the beets in bite size pieces. I like to leave to skin on for organic beets.
  • Crush mustard seeds with mortar and pestle just to a coarse grind
  • Place the diced beets and carrots into a half-gallon glass jar.
  • Add the Serrano pepper, mustard seeds and salt.
  • Add the water, leaving one-inch of air space between the top of the water and the top of the jar. Tightly cover the jar.
  • Ferment the kanji for 2-3 days at room temperature.
  • Stir with a clean wooden spoon and taste. If it’s tangy – it’s fermented and ready
  • You can transfer the jar to the fridge and store for a few weeks.

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Enjoy a cup or bowl of this delicious liquid and eat the pickles beet and add them to your salad.

BeetKanji-5784

Divine!

BeetKanji-5785

Sharing this at Angie’s Fiesta Friday

Fermented food experiments #1 – Red Cabbage quick pickle

Fermented foods are just beautiful  not only for the taste buds but also for your gut.  Ancients culture have propagated fermented foods for preservation and taste through the centuries. The souring action if microbes that produced fermentation have been critical in our diets throughout  the globe.  Similar foods can be found in every culture,  just called something different.

Indian “Achar” or “Kanji” are great examples and so is the fabulous “Kimchi” from Korea.

My personal story takes me back to the late 1970’s where as a young girl spending lazy winters vacation in Lucknow, India  I would watch my grandfather ferment and pickle various vegetables in earthenware and produce the probiotic liquid called “Kanji” in India. It  was delicious, tart and healthy and the joy of helping my grandfather  while he worked on these beautiful foods is a memory that is permanent ink in my soul.

True to foods that nourish your soul and help you remember your history, in this series I am sharing different fermented foods I am experimenting with.

Click here for a previous recipe of Kashmiri Achar

In this edition: Red Cabbage Pickle

https://foodforthesoul00.files.wordpress.com/2017/03/redcabbagepickle-5765.jpg

Continue reading Fermented food experiments #1 – Red Cabbage quick pickle